How To Hard-Boil Eggs

How To Hard-Boil An Egg | Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck Survive Despite A Whiskered Accomplice

Secret weapons come in many different shapes and sizes. In the kitchen, its best to use what tool works best, and not always stick to the conventional tool for the task. When it comes to hard-boiling eggs, I’ve found that the most useful tool to have on your side is a Pasta Fork. Let me just say right now, I have never to this day used the phrase Pasta Fork, because it’s just not in my vocabulary. However, when looking up spaghetti strainer online, I found that I have been calling this kitchen tool/gadget by the wrong name for my entire life. I’m originally from Western Maryland, so I’ll just go ahead and blame it on that. After all, we mountain folk consider grocery carts to be buggies, grocery stores to be markets, creeks to be cricks, and dinner to be supper. Whatever you call it, this little odd-shaped kitchen utensil makes it easier to get the eggs in and out of the water, without them accidentally cracking up against the side of the cooking pot and breaking open. So, next time you decide to hard-boil eggs, reach for this kitchen tool/gadget and see how much better it works for you as compared to the traditional slotted spoon.

How To Hard-Boil An Egg | Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck Survive Despite A Whiskered Accomplice

Ingredients:

  • Eggs
  • 1 Large Pot
  • Cold Water
  • 1 Pasta Fork
  • 1 Large Bowl
  • Ice

Directions:

  1. Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the eggs by at least one-inch.
  2. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat.
  3. Turn the heat down to medium, and use a pasta fork to slowly place one egg at a time into the hot water.
  4. Cook the eggs for 17 minutes.
  5. Fill a large bowl 3/4 of the way full with ice, and then add cold water. Use the pasta fork to remove the cooked eggs from the hot water and place them into the ice bath.
  6. Allow the eggs to bathe in the ice bath for at least an hour, before removing them for use, or storage in an airtight container to be refrigerated.

How to Hard-Boil An Egg | Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck Survive Despite A Whiskered AccompliceSuggestions:

  • Never use eggs that you have just purchased at the market to make deviled eggs. Older eggs are much easier to peel. If in a pinch, I scour the area for a store that tends to keep stock on hand several weeks before sale, such as Walgreens, CVS, or a gas station convenience store.
  • Allow the eggs to come to room temperature before placing them in the boiling water. This will help to keep the eggs from cracking open accidentally. You may choose to reduce the cooking time to 15 minutes if you go this route. I don’t usually think ahead far enough in advance to use this trick, but I have done it before, and it has made a difference.
  • Peeling the eggs under cold running water will make the whole egg peeling process much easier, and help to wash away any flecks of leftover peeled shell. Pat the eggs dry with paper towels before use.

Improvements:

  • Flip the eggs upside down in their carton, and allow them to sit overnight on the counter. This will help to center the egg yolk, leaving you with a perfectly placed yolk after boiling.
  • Add a 1/2-teaspoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of vinegar to the water before boiling. This will help prevent the eggs from cracking.

How To Hard-Boil Eggs

How To Hard-Boil Eggs

Ingredients:

  • Eggs
  • 1 Large Pot
  • Cold Water
  • 1 Pasta Fork
  • 1 Large Bowl
  • Ice

Directions:

  1. Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the eggs by at least one-inch.
  2. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat.
  3. Turn the heat down to medium, and use a pasta fork to slowly place one egg at a time into the hot water.
  4. Cook the eggs for 17 minutes.
  5. Fill a large bowl 3/4 of the way full with ice, and then add cold water. Use the pasta fork to remove the cooked eggs from the hot water and place them into the ice bath.
  6. Allow the eggs to bathe in the ice bath for at least an hour, before removing them for use, or storage in an airtight container to be refrigerated.
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Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck Deviled Egg Recipes:

Don’t forget to vote at http://www.egglandsbest.com/yourbestrecipe for my Balsamic Deviled Eggs with Pancetta recipe as a Fan Favorite in Eggland’s Best “Your Best Recipe” Contest.




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  • EllaY

    Oooo! Thanks for the tip on flipping the carton-I did not know that!

    • Colleen Delawder

      I’ll be doing it today at lunch time in anticipation of this weekends party. Hopefully my eggs aren’t too fresh…that may be my one big problem. I went to K-mart and Walgreens, but their storage looked disgusting and the eggs looked like a very cheap brand, which meant I ended up at 7-11. I’m hoping they’ve been sitting there for at least a week or more waiting for someone to buy them.